Chronology of the Battle of Britain

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July 10 to Oct 31, 1940

Date
Weather
Main targets and Events
Losses
Luftwaffe
Losses
RAF
July 10
Cloudy,clearing
Channel convoy. First dogfight of over 100 aircraft
13
6
11
Cloudy
East-coast shipping. Portland, Portsmouth
20
4
12
Fog, then thundery
East-and-south-coast shipping. Aberdeen, Portland. (Night) Bristol, S Wales
7
6
13
Fog, cloudy
Shipping off Dover and Portland. HQ  10 Group opens at Box
7
1
14
Light cloud, clear
Shipping off Dover and Swanage
2
4
15
Cloudy
Shipping off Norfolk coast.
3
1
16
Fog and cloud
Little activity. Hitler’s directive (#16) formally orders invasion preparations.
3
2
17
Light rain
Shipping off Dundee and Beachy Head
2
1
18
Light rain
Shipping off south-east coasts. South-coast ports. Some French and British airfields waterlogged.
4
3
19
Clear, showers
Dover. Bad day for Defiants of 141 squadron. Hitler’s ‘peace offer’ in Reichstag speech
2
8
20
Cloudy, clearing
Heavy raids on shipping at Dover and Lyme Bay. Me 110 appears as a fighter-bomber
9
3
21
Clear, showers
Heavy raids on shipping in Channel and Straits
9
6
22
Clear, few showers
Shipping off south coast. British rejection of ‘peace offer’.
1
0
23
Cloudy, rain
A few attacks on east-coast shipping
3
0
24
Cloudy, rain
Convoys in Channel
8
3
25
fine
Very heavy attacks on Channel convoy in cooperation with E-boats. 11 of 21 ships sunk or badly damaged.
18
7
26
rain
South-coast shipping. Channel convoys suspended in daylight hours
4
2
27
Clear, then stormy
Shipping. Two destroyers sunk and one damaged
4
1
28
fine
Shipping off Dover. South-coast ports. Destroyers withdraw from Dover to Portsmouth. Malan’s 74 squadron in heavy combat, the CO forcing Moelders into crash-landing
18
5
29
fine
Heavy attacks on Dover harbour and convoy; one destroyer sunk.
8
3
30
Cloud, light rain
Shipping off east –coast. Hitler instructs Goering to be ready for intensive operations at 12 hours notice
5
0
31
fine
Dover balloon barrage. Shipping off south-east and south-west coasts
5
3
August 1
Fine, haze
Shipping off south and east coasts. Norwich (aircraft factory). (Night) S Wales, Midlands. Hitler directive # 17 to Luftwaffe to ‘overpower the English air force with all the forces at its command, in the shortest possible time.’ Invasion preparations to be complete by 15 September.
9
1
2
Fine, drizzle over sea
Shipping off south-east coasts (Night) S Wales, Midland. Goering’s Adlerangriff directive to Luftwaffe.
4
0
3
Cloudy, bright intervals
Shipping. (Night) S. Wales, Crewe, Liverpool
4
0
4
Mainly fine
Little activity
0
0
5
fine
Shipping in Straits
6
1
6
Cloudy, windy
Little activity. Shipping. Goering orders Adlertag for 10 August.
1
1
7
Cloudy
Convoy off east coast
2
0
8
Cloudy, bright intervals
Heavy attacks on Channel convoy (the first westbound since 25 July) off Dover and Wight. Heaviest air fighting so far, involving 150 + plus aircraft. Ju 87s prove very vulnerable. (Night) Liverpool, Leeds, Bristol, Birmingham.
31
20
9
Cloud and rain
East-coast shipping. Dover balloons. Adlertag postponed.
5
4
10
Cloud and rain
Little activity
0
0
11
fine
Dover & Portland heavily attacked. Several senior Luftwaffe officers killed or captured. Convoys off east coast. (Night) Merseyside, Bristol Channel.
38
32
12
fine
Several RAF airfields (Manston, Lympne, Hawkinge) and radar stations (Dover, Rye, Dunkirk, Ventnor) attacked in preparation for Adlertag next day.
During this preparatory phase of the Battle the Luftwaffe attacked shipping on most days and laid mines on most nights, but sank only 30,000 tons out of the nearly 5 million tons which passed around the coasts. It lost 286 aircraft as against Fighter Command’s 148 (plus 2 at night). Except on five days, most raids were undertaken by small forces. The widespread raiding at night was mainly by very small numbers of aircraft.
31
22
13
fine
Adlertag postponement to afternoon causes confusion in Luftwaffe, which nevertheless flies almost 1,500 sorties in 24 hours. Attacks on Southampton, Portland, airfields at Detling, Andover, Eastchurch, Lympne). (Night) Castle Bromwich (aircraft factory).
45
13
14
Cloudy, bright intervals
Dover, airfields (Manston, Middle Wallop, Sealand).
19
8
15
Fine
Heaviest day’s fighting so far, with Luflotte 5 joining in from Scandinavia at heavy cost to its bombers and Me 110s. Many airfields damaged (Lympne, Hawkinge, Middle Wallop, West Malling, Eastchurch, Croydon, Martlesham, Driffield), but north of England never attacked in strength by day again. Fighter Command flies 974 sorties. Germans more strongly escorted. Hitler confirms invasion preparations to be completed by 15 September.
75
34
16
Fine
Heavy raids on airfields (in Kent, and at Gosport, Tangmere, Brize Norton). Ventnor radar station. Luftwaffe flies over 1,700 sorties. (Night) Home Counties, British Channel, East Anglia.
45
21
17
Fine
Lympne, otherwise mysterious silence from Luftwaffe. Shorter courses introduced for British fighter pilots. (Night) Mersey, S. Wales, Midlands.
3
0
18
Fine at first
Heavy fighting in course of intensive bombing of airfields in south and south-east (Croydon, Gosport, Ford, Thorney Island). Portsmouth. Big damage at Kenley airfield and Poling radar station. #
1(Royal Canadian Air Force) squadron’s first operations.
71
27
19
Cloudy
Southampton area, Pembroke docks. Goering issues orders for renewed attacks on Fighter Command. He orders stronger escort to Luftflotte 2’s bombers, and transfers single-engined fighters for this purpose from Luftflotte 3, which is to concentrate more on night bombing. Ju 87’s to be conserved for the invasion and special tasks.
6
3
20
Cloudy, windy over land, becoming rainy
Weather restricts German activities. Manston, Martlesham. Polish 302 squadron in action for first time, vengeful and effective. Churchill’s ‘Never . . . has so much been owed by so many to so few.’
7
2
21
Cloudy, rainy
Enemy operations mainly limited to fighter ‘tip and run’ raids. Airfields in East Anglia
14
1
22
cloudy
Convoys in Dover Straits. Manston. (Night) Aberdeen, Yorkshire, Hampshire, S. Wales, Bristol, Filton airfield and Bristol Co’s works).
3
5
23
Cloudy, showers
Minor activity. (Night) Bristol, S. Wales, Cardiff.
2
0
24
fine
Violent increase in Luftwaffe activity. Ramsgate, Dover, Portsmouth, and airfields (Manston five times, Hornchurch, N. Weald). (Night) S. Wales, Birmingham (aircraft factory), north-east coast and unintentional bombs on central London.
38
22
25
Fine, then cloudy
Driffield. Airfields in south-east, south and south-west (Warmwell), the bombers heavily escorted. (Night) RAF bomb Berlin in retaliation for bombs on London.
20
16
26
Cloudy, brighter later
Fierce and effective raids on airfields (especially Debden) mark the period of Fighter Command’s greatest strain. Dover, Folkestone. Ineffective attacks on Hornchurch and Portsmouth. (Night) Coventry, Birmingham, Plymouth.
41
31
27
Cloudy, rain
Weather restricts enemy action. (Night) Widely scattered raids on airfields and industrial areas. German army invasion plan settled.
9
1
28
Fair over land, cloudy over sea
Airfields (Eastchurch, Rochford). Luftwaffe fighter in sweeps. After further heavy losses the Defiant fighter is pulled out of the daylight battle.(Night) Much heavier night raiding begins—160 bombers against Merseyside, 180 elsewhere. In 600 sorties by night, Luftflotte 3 has lost only 7 aircraft.
30
20
29
Cloudy, clearing later
Some 700 Luftwaffe fighters in provocative sweeps to which RAF do not respond. The Chief of Kesselring’s fighter organization claims unlimited fighter superiority has been achieved. South and south-east airfields. (Night) Heavy raiding continues against Merseyside (176 sorties) and elsewhere (44 sorties).
17
9
30
Fine
Very heavy bombing of airfields (Lympne, Biggin Hill twice, Detling). Vauxhall works at Luton, (Night) Heavy bombing again on Merseyside
36
26
31
Fine
Very heavy bombing of airfields (Detling, Eastchurch, Croydon, and sector stations Biggin Hill, Hornchurch twice, and Debden). Some close to unserviceability. Radar stations also attacked. (Night) Merseyside heavily, Midlands
41
39
Total
808
428
September 1
Fine
Tilbury, Chatham. South-east airfields (Debden, and severe damage at Biggin Hill, Eastchurch, Detling). (Night) Bristol, S. Wales, Midlands, Merseyside.
14
15
2
Fine
Several airfields (including Biggin Hill, Lympne, Detling, Eastchurch three times, Hornchurch twice, Gravesend). Rochester (aircraft factory). (Night) Merseyside, Midlands, Manchester, Sheffield.
35
31
3
Fine
Airfields again (Manston, West Malling, much damage at North Weald) and heavy fighting. (Night) Merseyside, S. Wales, south-east England. Hitler moves target date for invasion from 15 to 21 September. Decision to be taken ten days beforehand.
16
16
4
Fine
Airfields. (Bradwell, Lympne, Eastchurch twice). Medway towns (aircraft factory at Rochester), Weybridge (aircraft factory). (Night) Liverpool, Bristol, south-east England. Hitler publicly threatens invasion also reprisals for British bombing of German towns.
25
17
5
Fine
Biggin Hill yet again and Detling. Thameshaven oil tanks set on fire (extinguished).
23
20
6
Fine
Airfields in south-east including Biggin Hill. Rochester and Weybridge (aircraft factories). A few Ju 87s employed again, and roughly handled, as were the Poles of 303 Squadron. Heavy and accurate attack on oil targets at Thameshaven: fires not extinguished attract further attack during the night. Coastal Command’s Photographic Reconnaissance Unit during the week has photographed steadily growing numbers of invasion craft in the Dutch, Belgian and French Channel ports, which from 5 September have come under attack from Bomber Command. British order Invasion Alert # 2-atttack probable within three days.
In the period from Adlertag on 13 August to 6 September, characterised by repeated attacks on the British airfields, the Luftwaffe has lost about 670 aircraft, Fighter Command 400. Fighter Command is holding its own, but is running down. The danger-points are that wastage of fighters is exceeding production, that a shortage of skilled pilots has developed, and that there has been much damage to the sector stations. Fortunately the Germans are about to switch to a different main objective.
35
23
7
Fine
The Luftwaffe switches to London, granting relief to the airfields: the turning point in the Battle. Some 1,000 enemy aircraft over and around the capital by day, followed by heavy night raid. Thameshaven and London docks the main objective in both cases. Code-word ‘Cromwell’ brings British forces to highest pitch of readiness and action stations.
41
28
8
Fine
Lull by day. London bombed heavily by night. Dowding’s ‘Squadron Stabilization’ scheme introduced.
15
2
9
Fine
Thames Estuary, Southampton. Major attack with some 200 bombers on London frustrated by 11 and 12 Groups, jettisoned bombs damaging suburbs widely.
28
19
10
Cloudy, rain
Slight activity. (Night) London, S. Wales, Merseyside. Bomber Command raid on Eindhoven airfield knocks out ten He 111s. Hitler postpones taking decision on the invasion until 14 September.
4
1
11
Cloudy, then fine
Four airfields. London, Southampton, Portsmouth. (Night) London, Merseyside.
25
29
12
Rain
Slight activity. The German barge concentrations still growing. (Night) London, S. Wales, Midlands, Merseyside.
4
0
13
Showers, bright intervals
Small raids only on London-little damage. (Night) London. All forces of Bomber Command, day and night, attack invasion ports and continue during next fortnight.
4
1
14
Showers, bright intervals
South London and radar stations. (Night) London, S. Wales. Hitler still pining his faith on the Luftwaffe postpones invasion decision for three more days, i.e. until 17 September. Earliest date for invasion would then be 27 September.
14
14
15
Fine
Largest ever German formations over London and south-east, in two big raids, but mainly broken up by the 24 Fighter Command squadrons operating on this day, since known as the Battle of Britain Day. An undisputed victory. Attacks also on Portland and Southampton. (Night) London, Midlands.
60
26
16
Cloudy, rain
Slight activity, mainly in south-east and East Anglia. (Night) London, Midlands, Merseyside.
9
1
17
Cloudy, showers
Activity as for the previous day, few bombers but fighter sweeps. British bombers sink 84 barges at Dunkirk. (Night) London, Merseyside. Hitler postpones invasion indefinitely, but orders preparations to continue.
8
5
18
Showers
The few daylight bombers, some attacking oil targets in the Estuary, suffer badly, nine Ju 88s of III/KG77 being shot down in 2 or 3 minutes. (Night) London, Merseyside. Germans begin to disperse invasion fleet to avoid further damage from bombing.
19
12
19
Showers
Little daylight activity. (Night) London, Merseyside and routine minelaying.
0
0
20
Showers
Heavy fighter-sweep towards London leads to dogfights, the outcome favouring the Luftwaffe more than usual. (Night) London.
7
7
21
Fine later
Fighter sweeps in east Kent. (Night) London, Merseyside.
0
0
22
Fog, showers
Slight activity. (Night) London, Merseyside.
1
0
23
Fine
Sweeps towards London. (Night) London, Merseyside.
9
11
24
Fine
Tilbury, Southampton (Woolston Spitfires factory damaged by fighter-bombers). (Night) London, Merseyside.
11
4
25
Fine
Plymouth, Portland, Bristol (filton). Further attack by heavily escorted bombers on aircraft factories. (Night) London, S. Wales, Lancashire.
13
4
26
Fine
Southampton. Woolston factory gutted but Spitfire production now well dispersed.
9
9
27
Fine
London, Bristol. Heavily escorted bomber raids on London and Filton largely frustrated with big losses to Ju 88s and Kesselring’s fighters. (Night) London, Midlands, Merseyside.
55
28
28
Fine
London, Solent. Scattered bomber raids massively escorted, with inevitable consequences. Hurricanes particularly suffering. (Night) London.
16
16
29
Fine
Some activity, reduced in south-east and E. Anglia. Liverpool bombed in daylight from the west but raid intercepted. (Night) London, Merseyside.
5
5
30
Fine
London, Westland factory at Yeovil (attack defeated). On this last day of mass daylight bomber raids that Luftwaffe re-introduces expensively discredited tactics and pays a heavy price in bombers and fighters for negligible damage. (Night) London.
48
20
October 1
Fair
A new phase opens in which the Germans use their main bomber force almost entirely under cover of darkness. In daylight they send over only small numbers of fast Ju 88s together with Messerschmitt fighters at high altitude carrying bombs protected by further fighters above. This activity occurs every day and proves extremely difficult to deal with, but strategically is of little benefit to the Germans. At night London is bombed heavily (by average of 150 bombers) every night of the month except one. ‘Fighter-bomber sweeps’ and ‘London’ are the entries to be understood for each date in this month.
6
4
2
Fine
10
1
3
Rain
Within the standard activity, a single Ju 88 hits the de Havilland factory at Hatfield.
9
1
4
Fog, rain
At their meeting Hitler informs Mussolini that only the lack of five days of consecutively good weather has frustrated his invasion plans.
12
3
5
Showers, bright periods
West Malling and Detling airfields. Southampton bombed without opposition in the air.
13
8
6
Rain
Small raids penetrate to several airfields (Middle Wallop, Northolt, Biggin Hill).
6
1
7
Cloud, showers
Heavier raid by escorted Ju 88s on Westland factory at Yeovil. Little damage and 7 of the enemy shot down.
21
17
8
Fair
Attack on Rootes’ works at Speke.
14
4
9
Cloud, rain
Airfields in the south-east.
9
3
10
Showers, bright intervals
Fighter-bombers in streams, great difficulty in intercepting.
4
4
11
Fair
7
9
12
Fog, clearing
Biggin Hill, Kenley. Hitler postpones invasion until-if then thought advisable-the spring of 1941
11
10
13
Fog, clearing
5
2
14
Rain
(Night) Heaviest raid on London thus far. Coventry also bombed.
4
0
15
Fair
For once RAF fighters bounce high-flying Me 109s out of the sun, shooting down 4. (Night) Heavier still on London 400 + bombers. Much damage and many railway termini out of action.
14
15
16
Cloudy
With the autumn weather, accident casualties on both sides from now on often exceed combat casualties.
13
1
17
Showery, bright intervals
15
3
18
Fog
Goering praises his fighter pilots for inflicting such terrible losses on Fighter Command, and his bomber pilots for having ‘reduced the British plutocracy to fear and terror.’
15
4
19
Cloud
5
2
20
Cloud
High-flying fighter-bombers revert to mass in place of streams
14
4
21
Fog
6
0
22
Fog
Five German crashes lead to loss of several senior officers. (Night) Glasgow as well as London.
11
5
23
Cloudy
3
1
24
Cloudy
8
4
25
Cloudy
Airfield at Montrose. (Night) Italians reluctantly allowed by the Germans to join in the bombing (Harwich), but with dismal results.
20
10
26
Cloudy, showers
10
4
27
Cloudy
Seven airfields attacked. Continuing fighter-bomber raids and individual tip-and-run bomber attacks force Fighter Command to fly over 1,000 sorties. That it can do so is proof of its continuing strength.
15
10
28
Cloudy
11
2
29
Fair
Portsmouth, Ramsgate, N. Weald. Tactical foresight leads to the shooting down of 11 high-flying Me 109s in 6 minutes. The Italians appear briefly by day with 15 bombers and 73 fighters, the CR42 biplanes causing more puzzlement than anxiety.
19
7
30
Rain
Unsuccessful attempt to penetrate to London by day
8
5
31
Rain
The great Battle fizzles out damply, the Germans having exhausted every tactical alternative, after being deprived of their best chance of victory by the inept decision of their Supreme Command to attack London rather than continue with the direct offensive against Fighter Command and its ground installations.
0
0
1636
922
The losses are basically given in the official history, The Defence of the United Kingdom (HMSO, London, 1957). They were compiled from Fighter Command sources on the British side, Luftwaffe Quartermaster-General sources on the German. Since then further work has been done, notably by Francis K. Mason in his Battle over Britain (McWhirter Twins, London 1969) and by researchers for the After the Battle publications, to refine and correct these figures, in particular by distinguishing losses in combat from those ariring from other causes. However, no other set of figures has been given official status, and these from the official history, if not unchallenged in detail, give a sufficiently clear indication of the scale of activity and the ratio of success.
Basic Statistics of Fighter Command and Luftwaffe Aircraft engaged in the Battle of Britain
BRITISH
 
Max.  Speed
Ceiling in feet
Armament
Fighters
 
 
 
Hurricane I
316 mph@ 17,500 feet
32,000
8 x .303 mg
Spitfire I
355 mph @19,000 feet
34,000
8 x .303 mg
Defiant
304 mph @ 17,000 feet
30,000
4 x .303 mg
Bombers
Blenheim IV
266 mph @ 11,000 feet
26,000
7 x .303 mg
 

IMG_0069 (Edited)
Fairey Battle

 

IMG_0070 (Edited)
Defiant
img_0068-edited
Hurricane
IMG_0062 (Edited)
Supermarine Spitfires Mk 1 of 19 Squadron
IMG_0089 (Edited)
Air Vice Marshall Trafford Leigh-Mallory 12 Group Commander
GERMAN
Fighters
Messerschmitt 109E
355 mph @ 18,000 feet
35,000
2 x 7.9 mm mg;
2 x 20 mm cannon (variable)
Messerschmitt 110
345 mph @ 23,000 feet
33,000
6 x 7.9 mm mg;
2 x 20 mm cannon
Bombers
Junkers 87B
245 mph @ 15,000 feet
23,000
3 x 7.9 mm mg
Junkers 88
287 mph @ 14,000 feet
23,000
3 x 7.9 mm mg
Dornier 17
255 mph @21,000 feet
21,000
7 x 7.9 mm mg
Dornier 215
Slightly enhanced performance
Heinkel 111
240 mph @ 14,000 feet
26,000
7 x 7.9 mm mg
IMG_0137 (Edited)
Stuka Ju 87
 
img_0087-edited
Messerschmitt Me 109 
IMG_0085 (Edited)
Junkers Ju 88
IMG_0080 (Edited)
L-R: Field Marshall Albert Kesselring; Lt. General Wilhelm Speidel; Field Marshall Hermann Goering
HIGHER COMMAND SUMMER 1940
WAR CABINET  advised by Chiefs of Staff
Admiralty
Air Ministry
War Office
Home Fleet
Naval Commands
(routine operational control)
Coastal Command
Bomber Command
Fighter Command
GHQ Home Forces
Area Combined HQs
Coastal Groups
ƒ
Bomber Groups
Fighter Groups
Observer Corps
Radar Group
Balloon Command
Operational control
A A Command
 
A A Divisions
Guns
Searchlights
 AIR DEFENCE HIGHER FORMATIONS JULY-SEPTEMBER 1940 ( Fighter Command)
Command
 
Operational Control
 
 
A A Command
# 10 Group
S.W. England
cooperation
5th AA Division
S. Wales & S.W. England
# 11 Group (S.E. England)
 
6th A A Division (S.E. Counties)
# 12 Group (Eastern Counties and Midlands)
 
1st A A Division (London)
# 13 Group (Northern England, Scotland and N. Ireland)
 
2nd A A Division (Eastern Counties & East Midlands)
# 60 Group (Radar Chain)
 
4th A A Division (N.W Counties, West Midlands & N. Wales)
Observer Corps
 
7th A A Division (N.E. Counties)
Balloon Command
 
3rd A A Division (Scotland & N. Ireland)
 
 
OSDEF (Orkneys & Shetlands)
OPERATIONAL CHAIN OF COMMAND IN THE LUFTWAFFE
OBERKOMMANDO DER WEHRMACHT (OKW)
(Armed Forces High Command)
OBERBEFEHLSHABER DER LUFTWAFFE (ObdL)
Luftwaffe Commander in Chief
LUFTFLOTTEN 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 (Air Fleets)
Administrative
Signals
Flak
Operational
Luftgau
 
 
Fliegerkorps I, II, IV, V, VIII, IX, etc. Assigned to each Luftflotte according to Operational Requirements
Airfields, Personnel, Medical, Maintenance, Supply & Training
1 to 6 assigned to each Luftflotte as required
 
 
Geschwader
Assigned to each Fliegerkorps according to Operational Requirements:
Kampfgeschwader (KG) Bomber
Stukageschwader (StG) Dive Bomber
Jagdgeshwader (KG) Fighter
Zerstoeregeschwader (ZG) Destroyer
Lehrgeschwader (LG) Operational Training etc
Airfield Regional Command
2 to 12 in each Luftgau as required
 
 
Gruppen
 (3 or 4 to each Geschwader)
Operational Airfield Command
One for each airfield
 
 
Staffeln
 (3 or 4 each Gruppe)
Nearest RAF equivalents
Geschwader = Group  
Gruppe = Wing  
Staffel = Squadron

 

Equivalent Commissioned Ranks: RAF and Luftwaffe
Air Chief Marshall
Generalfeldmarschall and Generaloberst
Air Marshall
General der Flieger
Air Vice-Marshall
Generalleutnant
Air Commodore
Generalmajor
Group Captain
Oberst
Wing Commander
Obersleutnant
Squadron Leader
Major
Flight Lieutenant
Hauptmann
Flying Officer
Oberleutnant
Pilot Officer
Leutnant
 FIGHTER COMMAND ORDER OF BATTLE 8 AUGUST 1940
HQ Bentley Priory, Stanmore; Air Chief Marshall Sir Hugh Dowding
# 10 Group, Box, Wilts; Air Vice-Marshall Sir Quintin Brand
Squadron
Aircraft
Station
Pembrey Sector
92
Spitfire
Pembrey
Filton Sector
87
Hurricane
Exeter
213
Hurricane
Exeter
St Eval Sector
234 Spitfire St Eval
247 (one flight) Gladiator Roborough
Middle Wallop Sector
238 Hurricane Middle Wallop
609 (West Riding) Spitfire Middle Wallop
604 (County of Middlesex) Blenheim Middle Wallop
152 Spitfire Warmwell

# 11 Group, Uxbridge; Air Vice-Marshall K.R. Park

Squadron Aircraft Station
Tangmere Sector
43 Hurricane Tangmere
601 (County of London) Hurricane Tangmere
145 Hurricane Westhampnett
Kenley Sector
6i5 Hurricane Kenley
64 Spitfire Kenley
111 Hurricane Croydon
Biggin Hill Sector
32 Hurricane Biggin Hill
610 (County of Chester) Spitfire Biggin Hill
501 (County of Gloucester) Hurricane Gravesend
600 (City of London) Blenheim Manston
Hornchurch Sector
54 Spitfire Hornchurch
65 Spitfire Hornchurch
74 Spitfire Hornchurch
41 Spitfire Hornchurch
Northolt Sector
1 Hurricane Northolt
257 Hurricane Northolt
North Weald Sector
151 Hurricane North Weald
56 Hurricane Rochford
25 Blenheim Martlesham
Debden Sector
17 Hurricane Debden
85 Hurricane Martlesham

# 12 Group, Watnall, Notts; Air Vice-Marshall T.L. Leigh Mallory

Squadron Aircraft Station
Duxford Sector
19 Spitfire Duxford
Coltishall Sector
242 Hurricane Coltishall
66 Spitfire Coltishall
Wittering Sector
229 Hurricane Wittering
266 Spitfire Wittering
23 Blenheim Colly Weston
Digby Sector
46 Hurricane Digby
611 (West Lancashire) Spitfire Digby
29 Blenheim Digby
Kirton-in-Lindsey Sector
222 Spitfire Kirton-in-Lindsey
264 Defiant Kirton-in-Lindsey and Ringway
Church Fenton Sector
73 Hurricane Church Fenton
249 Hurricane Church Fenton
616 (South Yorkshire) Spitfire Leconfiel

 # 13 Group, Newcastle Upon Tyne; Air Vice-Marshall R.E. Saul

Squadron Aircraft Station
Catterick Sector
219 Blenheim Catterick
Usworth Sector
607 Hurricane Usworth
72 Spitfire Acklington
79 Spitfire Acklington
Turnhouse Sector
232 Hurricane Turnhouse
253 Hurricane Turnhouse
605 (County of Warwick) Hurricane Drem
141 Defiant Prestwick
Dyce Sector
603 (City of Edinburgh) Spitfire Dyce & Montrose
Wick Sector
3 Hurricane Wick
504 (County of Nottingham) Hurricane Castletown
232 (one flight) Hurricane Sumburgh
Aldergrove Sector
245 Hurricane Aldergrove
55 ½ squadron; 28 Hurricane, 19 Spitfire, 6 Blenheim [night], 2 Defiant, ½ Gladiator
 LUFTWAFFE ORDER OF BATTLE AGAINST BRITAIN 13 AUGUST 1940
High Command Berlin (Reichmarschall H. Goering)
LUFTFLOTTE 2
HQ Brussels
(Generalfeldmarschall A. Kesselring)
LUFTFLOTTE 5
HQ Oslo
(Generaloberst H.-J. Stumpff)
LUFTFLOTTE 3
HQ Paris
(Generalfeldmarschall H. Sperrle)
FLIEGERKORPS 1
HQ Beauvais
KG1 (He 111)
KG 76 (Do 17 & Ju 88)
FLIEGERKORPS X
HQ Stavanger
I & III/KG26 (He 111)
I& III/KG30 (Ju 88)
I/ZG76 (Me 110)
FLIEGERKORPS IV
HQ Dinard
LG1 (Ju 88)
KG27 (He 111)
StG3 (Ju 87)
FLIEGERKORPS II
HQ Ghent
KG2 (Do 17)
KG3 (Do 17) KG53 (He 111)
II/StG1 (Ju 87)
IV/StLG1 (Ju 87)
Erprobungsgruppe 210
(Me 109 & 110)
 
FLIEGERKORPS V
HQ Villacoublay
KG 51 (Ju 88)
I & II/KG54 (Ju 88)
KG55 (He 111)
Fliegerdivision 9
HQ Soesterberg
KG4 (He 111 & Ju 88)
I/KG40 (FW 200)
KGr100 (He 111)
 
FLIEGERKORPS VIII
HQ Deauville
I & III/StG1 (Ju 87)
I & II/StG2 (Ju 87)
StG77 (Ju 87)
V/LG1 (Me 109)
Jagdfliegerfuehrer 2
HQ Wissant
JG3 (Me 109)
JG26 (Me-109)
JG51 (Me 109)
I & II/JG52 (Me 109)
JG54 (Me 109)
ZG26 (Me 110)
II & III/ZG76 (Me 110)
I/LG2 (Me 109)
 
Jagdfliegerfuehrer 3
HQ Cherbourg
JG2 (Me 109)
JG2 (Me 109)
JG27 (Me 109)
JG53 (Me 109)
I & II/ZG2 (Me 110)
Plus reconnaissance aircraft in all Luftflotten

 

TOTAL STRENGTH AND SERVICEABILITY 10 AUGUST 1940
Long-range bombers
1360
998
Dive-bombers
406
316
Single-engined fighters
813
702
Twin-engined fighters
319
261
Long-range reconnaissance
113
78
FIGHTER COMMAND ORDER OF BATTLE 7 SEPTEMBER 1940
HQ Bentley Priory, Stanmore
(Air Chief Marshall Sir Hugh Dowding)
 # 10 Group, Box, Wilts (Air Vice-Marshall Sir Quintin Brand)
Squadron
Aircraft
Station
Pembrey Sector
92
Spitfire
Pembrey
Filton Sector
87 Hurricane Exeter & Bibury
213 Hurricane Exeter
St Eval Sector
238 Hurricane St Eval
247 (one flight) Gladiator Roborough
Middle Wallop Sector
234 Spitfire Middle Wallop
609 (West Riding) Spitfire Middle Wallop
604 (County of Middlesex) Blenheim Middle Wallop
56 Hurricane Boscombe Down
152 Spitfire Warmwell
 

# 11 Group, Uxbridge

(Air Vice-Marshall K.R. Park

Squadron Aircraft Station
Tangmere Sector
43 Hurricane Tangmere
601 (County of London) Hurricane Tangmere
602 (City of Glasgow) Spitfire Westhampnett
Kenley Sector
66 Spitfire Kenley
253 Hurricane Kenley
72 Spitfire Croydon
111 Hurricane Croydon
Biggin Hill Sector
79 Spitfire Biggin Hill
501 (County of Gloucester) Hurricane Gravesend
Hornchurch Sector
222 Spitfire Hornchurch
603 (City of Edinburgh) Spitfire Hornchurch
600 (City of London) Blenheim Hornchurch
41 Spitfire Rochford
Northolt Sector
1 (Royal Canadian Air Force)
Hurricane
Northolt
303 (Polish)
Hurricane
Northolt
504 (County of Nottingham)
Hurricane
Northolt
1
Hurricane
Heath Row
North Weald Sector
249
Hurricane
North Weald
46
Hurricane
Stapleford Abbots
Debden Sector
17
Hurricane
Debden
257
Hurricane
Martlesham & North Weald
25
Blenheim
Martlesham
73
Hurricane
Castle camps
 # 12 Group, Watnall, Notts. (Air Vice-Marshall T.L. Leigh Mallory)
Squadron
Aircraft
Station
Duxford Sector
19
Spitfire
Duxford
310 (Czechoslovak)
Hurricane
Duxford
Coltishall Sector
242
Hurricane
Coltishall
616 (South Yorkshire)
Spitfire
Coltishall
266
Spitfire
Coltishall & Wittering
Wittering Sector
229
Hurricane
Wittering
23
Blenheim
Wittering
Digby Sector
151
Hurricane
Digby
611 (West Lancashire)
Spitfire
Digby
29
Blenheim
Digby
Kirton-in-Lindsey Sector
74
Spitfire
Kirton-in-Lindsey
264
Defiant
Kirton-in-Lindsey and Ringway
Church Fenton Sector
85
Hurricane
Church Fenton
302 (Polish)
Hurricane
Church Fenton
64
Spitfire
Church Fenton & Ringway
 # 13 Group, Newcastle Upon Tyne  (Air Vice-Marshall R.E. Saul)
Squadron
Aircraft
Station
Catterick Sector
219
Blenheim
Catterick
54
Spitfire
Catterick
Usworth Sector
607
Hurricane
Usworth
610 (County of Chester)
Spitfire
Acklington
32
Hurricane
Acklington
Turnhouse Sector
65
Spitfire
Turnhouse
615
Hurricane
Prestwick
605 (County of Warwick)
Hurricane
Drem
141
Defiant
Prestwick
Dyce Sector
145 (City of Edinburgh)
Hurricane
Dyce & Montrose
Wick Sector
3
Hurricane
Castletown
232 (one flight)
Hurricane
Sumburgh
Aldergrove Sector
245
Hurricane
Aldergrove

IMG_1398

 By courtesy of the authors and publisher

IMG_0139 (Edited)
By courtesy of the author and publisher

 

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3 thoughts on “Chronology of the Battle of Britain

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